Capital Region Living Magazine
 




Maple Syrup


 Well, the New York State Maple thinks so. Pure maple syrup is a natural and nutritious sweetener and is a smart choice as a topping or as a flavorful ingredient in baking and cooking. Maple syrup is 100 percent natural and unrefined, retaining the inherent nutritional value of the sap obtained from the maple tree. This will be an early and great production year!

Maple syrup is an important nutrient source and a very good source of vitamins and minerals. Native North Americans were the first to recognize pure maple syrup as a source of nutrition and energy. Researchers have since shown that maple syrup has a higher nutritional value than all other common sweeteners. All information gathered from www.nysmaple.com/about-nys-maple/Nutrition.

 Pure maple syrup is not only a wholesome natural flavor, but it contains no additives and has one of the lowest calorie counts of the common sweeteners.

Now, we mentioned this to ease your conscience when eating some great recipes that may not be on the nutritionists’ “Bestie” list.
 

Maple syrup is categorized in four different grades for color and taste. 

The four levels of maple are:

• Golden Color With Delicate Taste
• Amber Color With Rich Taste
• Dark With Robust Taste
• Very Dark With Strong Taste.

See, and taste, for yourself at Maple Weekend March 19-20 & April 2-3. 

For more information go to www.mapleweekend.com.

Recipes are from members of New York State Maple.
 

Maple cinnamon bread  

variation - with raisins

makes 3 loaves

2 pkgs active dry yeast

3/4 cup warm water (105-115 )

Dissolve yeast in warm water

When dissolved, add the following to the yeast mixture:

2 2/3 cup warm water

1/4 cup granulated maple sugar

1 tbsp. salt

3 tbsp. shortening

5 cup flou
 

• Beat until smooth
• Then add another 4 to 5 cups of flour - enough to make an easy-to-handle dough.
• Knead on floured board about 10 minutes.
• Place in greased bowl, cover and let rise in warm place until double (about 1 hour).
• Punch dough down and divide in thirds. Roll each into an 8" by 12" rectangle. 
• Spread each with 1 tbsp. soft butter. Mix 1 tsp. cinnamon with 1/4 cup maple sugar for each rectangle, and sprinkle over the butter. You can also sprinkle with raisins if desired.
• Roll dough from narrow end. Place in greased loaf pan. Let rise in warm place until double (about 1 hour).
• Bake at 350 for 20 minutes.
 

Maple fudge 

1/2 lb. butter
1/2 lb. granulated maple sugar
1 lb. confectioner's sugar
• Melt butter on low heat
• Add maple sugar, mix until smooth keeping on low heat.  Then hand mix in confectioner's sugar until well blended.• Optional: Nuts or chips may blended in as desired
• Press into pan, let cool, slice



Kim's super healthy peanut butter protein bars   
1 cup organic peanut butter
2/3 cup granulated maple sugar
2 eggs
2 scoops vanilla protein powder
Dark chocolate for drizzle topping
• Mix all ingredients except chocolate.
• Form into individual cookies, or press into an 8" by 8" pan to make bars.
• Bake at 35 for 10 minutes.
• Drizzle with melted dark chocolate when cool.


Apple cranberry crisp 
5 cups peeled, cored, thinly sliced cooking apples
1 cup cranberries
2 tbsp. maple granulated sugar
 
Topping:
1/2 tsp. cinnamon or apple pie spice mix
1/2 cup quick-cooking rolled oats
3 tbsp. packed granulated maple sugar
2 tbsp. flour
1/2 tsp. cinnamon or apple pie spice mix
2 tbsp. butter
• Preheat oven to 375 . 
• In a 2-quart baking dish combine apples & cranberries. 
• Stir together the sugar and spice and sprinkle over apples, then toss to mix in.
• In small bowl combine dry ingredients. Cut the butter in with fork or pastry blender until crumbly. Sprinkle evenly over apple mix.
• Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until apples are tender.
 

 

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